Epilepsy and Convulsion are Curable

Epilepsy and Convulsion are Curable

Epilepsy and Convulsion are Curable

Treatments for Epilepsy – Part I

Epileptic seizures are mainly controlled by medicinal treatments. These drugs, which are often anticoagulants, are prescribed based on various factors such as the number and severity of the seizures, patient age and physical condition, and patient medical history. There is a large range of drugs for epileptic seizures and most drugs have been introduced recently. Dilantin, phenobarbital, carbamazepine (Tegretol), acetazolamide, topiramate, primidone, lamotrigine, valpromide, and flurazepam are among the old anticonvulsant drugs. In addition, felbamate, gabitril, lamictal, neuropentin, trileptal, and zonisamide are among the most recent drugs prescribed as anticonvulsants.

In general, there is a slight difference between all of the anticonvulsant drugs. Moreover, as stated, the drug choice depends on the patient’s condition. Different patients may stage different reactions to the side effects of drugs and this fact affects the physician’s prescriptions.

More than 70% of the epileptic patients are controlled by medicine, but when the medicinal treatments fail, the surgical procedures are employed. Epilepsy surgery is explained in the “Services” section and you can read the subsequent blogs for more information.

 

The Side Effects of Anticonvulsants

The side effects of the anticonvulsant drugs are classified into the following three categories.

  • Common and expectable side effects:

These side effects are general and nonspecific and are observed depending on the prescribed dosage following the intake of all anticonvulsants. The unpleasant symptoms include blurred vision, sleepiness, depression, ataxia, and cramps. These symptoms are not specific to any particular anticonvulsant because they affect the central nervous system.

  • Patient-specific side effects:

These side effects are rare and unpredictable and are not determined by the dosage. These side effects often include skin irritation and inflammation, decreased blood cells, and hepatic problems.

  • Rare side effects:

These side effects are not the same with all drug families. For example, gum inflammation and pain are among the side effects of dilantin, while the intake of depakine results in hair loss.

In general, in more than 70% of the patients the seizures are controlled by drugs, but sometimes the drugs fail and there is a need for surgery. The epilepsy surgery is explained in the “Services” section and you can read the subsequent blogs for more information.

amir bigdeli
amir bigdeli
it manager in paytakht medical imaging center

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